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10 Most Boring Countries to Live in

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There are several factors to be taken into account when listing the 10 most boring countries to live in because any place has its beauty. The real question one must ask oneself while attempting this task is “who is it boring for?”, because no two countries are the same, and as we know, neither are two people. It’s certainly not the same to be a man as being a woman residing in the Middle East, a Jew in some still very dubious Austrian cities, or, as from now, a Mexican in the USA.

10 Most Boring Countries to Live in

Vladimir Gjorgiev/Shutterstock.com

The countries with the most chances to make the list are affluent ones, which makes complete sense because, however nasty it may sound, boredom is mostly a privilege (as well as a curse). Take northern European countries, for example, they experience firsthand first-world boredom, which means nothing ever happens there, there’s no crime, no punishment, no nothing; there’s so much nothing going on that people kill themselves just to have something to do. In this same line of reasoning, third world countries are almost excluded from this list, because even though jumping from one economic/social/political crisis to another might not be exactly “fun,” it certainly keeps things entertaining. Furthermore, many of these have wonderful natural sites to offer, so check out our 10 Most Biodiverse Countries in the World.

There’s also religion and tradition based boredom, which is something we can see mainly in the Middle East, where many times law is set on the basis of Islamic religion, which forbids certain activities that are considered pleasurable in most places around the world, such as “free love” and libations. These places tend to be especially tedious for women, who are the biggest beneficiaries in the boredom industry, however in some places the laws are so severe that no one gets away with having fun.

Likewise, there are places that have been branded by history, as is the case of former communist nations. We’re talking about territory where fun was once basically prohibited, and I know this is speaking from a very occidental point of view, but being cut off from the rest of the world just can’t be fun. Imagine you are a country and your parents suddenly forbade you to see your friends because they had a fight with their parents on the basis that they disagreed on how to raise their children. Even though you might outgrow your childhood teachings, that stuff will stick with you.

Last but not least, I must also point out two factors that have an influence as well: size and remoteness. Being a small country takes a toll on your fun rate as well, just because of the fact that you run out of things to do fairly quickly.

Now, considering the previous, I shall explain my rating methodology, which might sound unorthodox, but read me out. Boring is the opposite of fun, right? And when you think fun, you think “party” –or at least I do – so I have decided to take into account the most important party factors that weigh in throwing of either an unforgettable feast or a total fiasco. The aspects to consider are the following: gender-balanced assistance rate (male-female ratio) and size of the house vs. assistance rate (demographics), host’s and guests’ view on “the babes” (social gender equality), amount of booze and party favors (legislation/availability of alcohol and drugs), games (activities and entertainment), house owner’s belief-based right of admittance (tolerance for other cultures and religions), manners of the participants (cultural behavioral factors), and OF COURSE: the weather. In each case, I’ll evaluate the most pertinent and highest weighting factors according to each individual country. Don’t worry, I’ll also provide you with all the raw data, so read on and get ready to party!

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