Dear Valued Visitor,

We have noticed that you are using an ad blocker software.

Although advertisements on the web pages may degrade your experience, our business certainly depends on them and we can only keep providing you high-quality research based articles as long as we can display ads on our pages.

To view this article, you can disable your ad blocker and refresh this page or simply login.

We only allow registered users to use ad blockers. You can sign up for free by clicking here or you can login if you are already a member.

7 Master Sommelier Facts, Salary, Exam Costs, Jobs, and More

Page 1 of 8

Today, we present you 7 master sommelier facts regarding salary, exam costs, and more.

You pour your first glass of wine for the night. Look deep into its burgundy glow. What is it telling you? Is it young, old, oaky, sweet, spicy, or rich? Does it pair well with a certain meal? Should you savor it alone?

Also, if the wine is talking to you is it really your first glass? Be honest with us, or this relationship will never succeed—clearly the truth is that you love wine.

So, you want to be a sommelier. First you need more information than just to know how much you love wine. Everyone loves wine! With that, we have compiled 7 master sommelier facts, salary, exam costs, jobs and more.

People have been drinking wine for thousands of years. Literally—8,000 years ago in Georgia, the former Soviet republic Stone Age humans were consuming wine. We know this because scientists recently unearthed ceramics from the 5th and 6th century BC with wine residue inside of them.

The modern sommelier was invented right alongside the modern-day restaurant—before these people didn’t order off menus they simply ate the meal the tavern owners provided. However, ancestral remnants of the sommelier stretch at least as far back as the 12 century when royal butlers would procure wine for the court.

Early wine stewards cropped up in France after the revolution. With the aristocratic class reduced—many chefs were unemployed. Therefore they sought to open small public restaurants. These restaurants needed beverage managers—likely rejected kitchen help or unemployed workers with food training—these prototypical sommeliers would haggle over barrels. Bottles of wine did not become standard fare until the mid-1900s.

So what exactly is a master sommelier one might ask? And what do they do? To simply put, a sommelier is a wine steward, someone professionally trained in the art of wine and food pairing. Take a sip of these 7 master sommelier facts, salary, exam costs, jobs and more to get a deeper understanding of the specifics of this job and see if it is to your taste. If not, you can always read about 11 Easiest and Best Paying Jobs in the World, and see if something better suits you there. 

Now we’ll start our list answering the most basic question:

Page 1 of 8