Dear Valued Visitor,

We have noticed that you are using an ad blocker software.

Although advertisements on the web pages may degrade your experience, our business certainly depends on them and we can only keep providing you high-quality research based articles as long as we can display ads on our pages.

To view this article, you can disable your ad blocker and refresh this page or simply login.

We only allow registered users to use ad blockers. You can sign up for free by clicking here or you can login if you are already a member.

It Keeps Getting Worse for Apple Inc. (AAPL)’s Long-Rumored TV

Page 1 of 2

During Tuesday’s earnings call, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) CFO Peter Oppenheimer said the company is planning to unveil new products this fall.

According to Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster, one of those products could be a television set. Munster has been predicting that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) will release a full-fledged TV for years, and now thinks that Apple could announce a TV this fall.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)The problem is that, as Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) continues to delay, its competitors are moving in, offering alternative devices that seem to accomplish the same task at a much lower price.

Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG)’s $11 smart TV

Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) unveiled the Chromecast dongle on Wednesday. The device allows users to beam media from their smartphone, tablet or laptop to their TV’s screen.

But its most impressive feature is its cost. It retails for just $35 and includes three free months of Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) (a $24 value). Essentially, with the Chromecast, users are getting a Roku or Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) TV for just $11.

Granted, there are some drawbacks — owners will need to pair a tablet or smartphone to the device to use it. This means that users who like to tweet or browse the Internet on their tablet while also watching TV will be out of luck.

Nevertheless, at such a bargain price, it’s almost guaranteed to sell well, which should benefit the search giant.

Chromecast owners who want to send videos from their laptop to their TV will need to be using Google’s Chrome browser. And while the device supports iOS, reports indicate that it will favor media purchased from Google’s Play store, rather than iTunes or Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN).

Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT)’s Xbox One is as much of an entertainment hub as it is a gaming console

Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT)’s Xbox One costs roughly 14 times more than Google’s Chromecast, but it offers some major features that the Chromecast lacks.

As I’ve written before, the Xbox One is as much of a media hub as it is a gaming console.

Owners of the Xbox One will be able to control their cable box using just their voice. Voice commands like “watch HBO” or “watch The History Channel” will replace the traditional (and often confusing) TV remote.

The Xbox One also has Skype connectivity for video chat, and integration with the popular streaming apps.

Microsoft’s entertainment division has historically been a small part of the business. But with the Windows operating system in decline, and the company reorganizing itself to focus on “devices and services,” Microsoft may put more focus behind the Xbox in the years to come.

Don’t count out the cable companies

And then there are the cable companies. While many may have written them off as mismanaged, lumbering giants just waiting to be displaced, that’s far from the truth.

Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA) announced its X2 platform earlier in the summer. The cloud-based cable box is, in many ways, the Xbox One light.

Like the Xbox One, it includes voice commands, which can be given to the box right from the remote. It’s integrated with web apps, and allows for a more personalized experience, with the ability to offer programming suggestions based on a subscriber’s taste.

I think it’s unlikely that Comcast will be able to match the experience offered by a dedicated device like the Xbox One or Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) TV. However, if it’s “good enough” and free to existing Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA) subscribers (about one-fifth of cable subscribers in the US), it could limit the demand for expensive smart TV solutions.

It could also help differentiate Comcast from its competitors. AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) and Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE:VZ) have expanded into Comcast’s market, and the X2 platform would give it something to keep its subscribers from switching.

Page 1 of 2
Loading Comments...