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Whole Foods Market, Inc. (WFM), LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. (LF), Google Inc (GOOG): These Companies Really Do Want to Make Your Life Better

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Whole Foods (WFM)As an investor, I always love finding companies that positively shape the way we do things.

More important, I admire businesses that can do so with every intention of not only inflating their own bank accounts, but also genuinely striving to improve their customers’ lives.

The building blocks of success
Last month, the folks at AdWeek astutely described “How Lego Became the Most Valuable Toy Company in the World.”

Of course, one stroll down the toy aisle can tell you that Lego has made the most of its licensing deals with megabrands like Star Wars, Harry Potter, Winnie the Pooh, and a variety of Marvel and DC Comics properties, to name only a few.

However, Lego can also largely thank its decades-long dominance to its focus on bolstering kids’ creativity. In fact, Lego’s stated mission is “to inspire and develop the builders of tomorrow by engaging children across the world in positive play and hands-on, minds-on creativity.”

According to Lego brand relations director Michael McNally:

It’s really about getting as many kids as possible to build. Every time a child engages in that, she’s learning really important life skills — she just doesn’t know it. It’s about patience and persistence, and trial and error, and at the end, she’s really proud of what she built.

Unfortunately for us, Lego is currently a privately held company, so everyday investors can’t simply buy its shares through their favorite discount broker.

That said, here are four other companies who really do want to make your life better — and whose stocks you can buy:

Whole Foods Market, Inc. (NASDAQ:WFM) — “America’s healthiest grocery store”
The team at Whole Foods Market, Inc. (NASDAQ:WFM) has long made clear their mission, which includes holding to a central list of core values they describe as the steady “underpinning of our company culture.” Among the items on that list are “selling the highest quality natural and organic products available,” “satisfying and delighting our customers,” “supporting team member excellence and happiness,” “caring about our communities and our environment,” and “creating wealth through profits and growth.”

Of course, many investors are most excited about that last item, and Whole Foods Market, Inc. (NASDAQ:WFM) has certainly delivered on that promise by helping early shareholders return more than 36 times their initial investment over the past 20 years. Even so, I think Whole Foods Market, Inc. (NASDAQ:WFM) has plenty of growth left, so I put my money where my mouth is and bought Whole Foods stock for the first time last month.

LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE:LF) — “We put learning first — a philosophy that distinguishes us from our competitors and fuels the entire company.”
Anyone who has kids knows how effective LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE:LF)’s products can be. In fact, my own children frequently request LeapFrog’s educational programs on Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX). Even better, our 2-year-old surprised us earlier this year by recognizing and saying the name of every letter in the alphabet as I randomly pointed them out — something we had worked on a little, but with which I’m sure LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE:LF) lent its helping hand.

If that weren’t enough, the company also managed to beat first-quarter earnings estimates earlier this month, is generating tons of cash, and looks cheap, as it currently trades for just 13 times next year’s estimated earnings.

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