Dear Valued Visitor,

We have noticed that you are using an ad blocker software.

Although advertisements on the web pages may degrade your experience, our business certainly depends on them and we can only keep providing you high-quality research based articles as long as we can display ads on our pages.

To view this article, you can disable your ad blocker and refresh this page or simply login.

We only allow registered users to use ad blockers. You can sign up for free by clicking here or you can login if you are already a member.

The Profitable Characteristics of Bank Stocks: Bank of America Corp (BAC), Citigroup Inc. (C)

Page 1 of 2

Banking stocks have again shown their excellent investment characteristics. As a group, they have risen almost 25% from 2010 and more than doubled since the market low in 2009. Though rewarding, the underlying business details of bank stocks can be difficult to understand. For example, the latest earnings release from JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE:JPM) was a brutal 64 pages of complex numbers and industry jargon.

Luckily, making money from these stocks can be a lot less complicated. Focusing on three fundamental attributes of the industry can help in turning that profit.

1. These companies are built to make money.

Banks have a very lucrative business model. While the details can be very complicated, the basics are pretty simple. They raise money at a low rate, invest it at a higher rate, and after keeping operating costs low, profit from the difference. The most significant distinction for a bank is how it invests. Most of them fit into one of three categories:

Investment Banks

Investment Banks are institutions that invest into transactions relating to corporate high finance. They get involved with advising & funding mergers or acquisitions, stock and bond offerings, and now mostly principal trading & market making.

Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (NYSE:GS) and Morgan Stanley (NYSE:MS), the last two major U.S. investment banks, generate roughly 60% to 70% of their profits from principal trading and market making. Though this business sounds risky, it is amazingly consistent in earning a profit.

Lending Banks

Lending Banks are institutions that invest their money in loans to commercial or consumer clients. These banks range in size from small local savings institutions to larger regional players with one of the largest being Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC). Wells generates roughly 52% of its revenue from what is called net interest margin, or the difference between the interest they collect on loans less the cost of what they pay on deposits. They also get another 40% of their revenue from fees collected on servicing loans and deposits.

Bank of America Earnings ReportHybrid Banks

A 1933 law separated the business of investment banking and general lending. When that law was repealed Investment Banks could begin lending and Lending Banks began getting into mergers, acquisitions and trading. After some big mergers, what I call the Hybrid Banks were created. These banks do both investment banking and lending.

JPMorgan Chase is the biggest with almost $2.4 trillion in assets. It generates about 66% of revenue from lending & fees with most of the rest from investment banking. Other large hybrids include Bank of America Corp (NYSE:BAC) with roughly 71% of their business related to lending and Citigroup Inc. (NYSE:C) where lending accounted for about 70% of their revenues.

2. Occasionally these companies blow up.

As wonderful as their business model is, banks have a tendency to occasionally blow up. When times are good, they often get greedy or stupid and invest poorly. There have been innumerable examples of their bad judgment. A couple of recent headline examples have been JPMorgan’s “London Whale” situation and the industry’s sub-prime mortgage fiasco. Sometimes the blow-ups are large and on an industry wide scale, sometimes on a smaller, individual company scale.

Page 1 of 2
Loading Comments...